•  
  •  
 

ANIMAL SHELTERING

MAY / JUNE 2010

Articles

PDF

Scoop

A low-cost spay/neuter program helps the poor of Washington state spay and neuter their animals; animal welfare advocates contest the tradition of carriage horses in New York; a raptor rehabilitator returns a hawk to the skies after she makes a wrong turn—through someone’s dining room window; an event involving the Brooklyn Bridge and glow-in-the-dark leashes raises money and awareness for shelter pets; a Louisiana community devastated by Hurricane Katrina celebrates the long-awaited opening of a new animal shelter; and more.

PDF

Coffee Break

In your space, you told us how your organization handles naming adoptable animals, who does it, if any names are forbidden, and whether some names have more appeal to adopters.

 

Reaching Out to the Senior Community

With Americans living longer and healthier lives, senior citizens make up a larger portion of the population. Many have pets but may need occasional assistance in caring for them; many who don’t have pets might benefit from a little furry company. Some shelters are reaching out to their communities’ elders, bringing them pet supplies and assistance, or—through animal visitation programs—affection and attention on four paws.

PDF

An Unexpected Truth

When a new breed-specific ordinance in Omaha threatened to undo all the work the Nebraska Humane Society had put into trying to place some of the shelter’s pit bulls and pit bull mixes, the organization made the best of an unfortunate situation. A revised city ordinance aims to change the human end of the leash, making people aware that irresponsible pet owners are a big part of the problem.

PDF

A Tribute to Mutts

Once disparaged as “mongrels,” mixed-breed dogs are actually the ultimate hybrids—each one like a purebred unto itself. Shelters might do well to follow the example of boutique stores and let the public know that their available mutts are really something unique— a treat for true dog lovers.

PDF

The “101” Department

Insurance companies have traditionally taken a dim view of writing policies for shelters and rescue groups, seeing them as complex, vaguely mysterious operations rife with potential for lawsuits. But you can take steps to persuade insurance carriers that your organization is responsible and trustworthy—in other words, worth the risk.

PDF

Q&A

Haunted by scenes of neglect and cruelty she’d witnessed as a result of pets being chained for long periods—sometimes until they starved to death—Paulette Dean, executive director of the Danville Area Humane Society, was determined to end the practice in her Virginia community.

PDF

Humane Law Forum

Animal welfare advocates and shelter staff may have the best of intentions when they forward an e-mailed “DNA” (Do Not Adopt) recommendation. But doing so can test the limits of free speech and even stray into illegality, possibly leading to claims of defamation, libel, or slander.

PDF

Volunteer Management

Both inexperienced and expert volunteers can be helpful to your program, but the last thing you want to do is bring in “green” volunteers and fail to provide them the training they need. This happens all the time in shelters and rescue groups, and it’s a setup for frustration and disappointment. Learn how to match volunteers’ skill sets to the tasks that need to be done.

PDF

Off Leash

In a chance encounter during a trip to India, British photographer Eloise Leyden stumbled upon TOLFA (Tree of Life for Animals), a nonprofit that cares for former street dogs at its sanctuary in Pushkar. The people (and canines) she met there played a role in the creation of her photography book, Slum Dogs of India.