•  
  •  
 

Volume 1 (2016)

Harnad, Stevan (2016) Animal sentience: The other-minds problem. Animal Sentience 1(1)

Kiley-Worthington, Marthe (2016) Nonhuman mind-reading ability. Animal Sentience 1(2)

Racine, Timothy P. (2016) The grounds for animal subjectivity and intersubjectivity. Animal Sentience 1(3)

Harnad, Stevan (2016) Cross-species mind-reading. Animal Sentience 1(4)

Bookstein, Fred L. (2016) "Beyond words," yes, but also beyond numbers. Animal Sentience 2(2)

Colombo, Michael and Johnston, Melissa (2016) Introspection and anecdotes won’t prove what animals are thinking and feeling. Animal Sentience 2(3)

Key, Brian (2016) Why fish do not feel pain. Animal Sentience 3(1)

Balcombe, Jonathan (2016) Cognitive evidence of fish sentience. Animal Sentience 3(2)

Braithwaite, Victoria A. and Droege, Paula (2016) Why human pain can’t tell us whether fish feel pain. Animal Sentience 3(3)

Broom, Donald M. (2016) Fish brains and behaviour indicate capacity for feeling pain. Animal Sentience 3(4)

Brown, Culum (2016) Comparative evolutionary approach to pain perception in fishes. Animal Sentience 3(5)

Chella, Antonio (2016) Robot fish do not need sentience. Animal Sentience 3(6)

Dinets, Vladimir (2016) No cortex, no cry. Animal Sentience 3(7)

Haikonen, Pentti O. (2016) On the sentience of fish. Animal Sentience 3(8)

Hart, Paul J.B. (2016) Fighting forms of expression. Animal Sentience 3(9)

Jones, Robert C. (2016) Fish sentience and the precautionary principle. Animal Sentience 3(10)

Manzotti, Riccardo (2016) No evidence that pain is painful neural process. Animal Sentience 3(11)

Mather, Jennifer A. (2016) An invertebrate perspective on pain. Animal Sentience 3(12)

Ng, Yew-Kwang (2016) Could fish feel pain? A wider perspective. Animal Sentience 3(13)

Seth, Anil K. (2016) Why fish pain cannot and should not be ruled out. Animal Sentience 3(14)

Striedter, Georg (2016) Lack of neocortex does not imply fish cannot feel pain. Animal Sentience 3(15)

Key, Brian (2016) Going beyond just-so stories. Animal Sentience 3(38)

Baluška, František (2016) Should fish feel pain? A plant perspective. Animal Sentience 3(16)

Burghardt, Gordon (2016) Mediating claims through critical anthropomorphism. Animal Sentience 3(17)

Derbyshire, Stuart W.G. (2016) Fish lack the brains and the psychology for pain. Animal Sentience 3(18)

Elwood, Robert W. (2016) A single strand of argument with unfounded conclusion. Animal Sentience 3(19)

Gagliano, Monica (2016) What would the Babel fish say?. Animal Sentience 3(20)

Godfrey-Smith, Peter (2016) Pain in parallel. Animal Sentience 3(21)

Gonçalves-de-Freitas, Eliane (2016) Pain and fish welfare. Animal Sentience 3(22)

Merker, Bjorn (2016) Drawing the line on pain. Animal Sentience 3(23)

Rose, James D. (2016) Pain in fish: Weighing the evidence. Animal Sentience 3(25)

Shriver, Adam J. (2016) Cortex necessary for pain — but not in sense that matters. Animal Sentience 3(27)

Sneddon, Lynne U. and Leach, Matthew C. (2016) Anthropomorphic denial of fish pain. Animal Sentience 3(28)

Stevens, E. Don (2016) Why is fish “feeling” pain controversial?. Animal Sentience 3(29)

Van Rysewyk, Simon (2016) Nonverbal indicators of pain. Animal Sentience 3(30)

Wadiwel, Dinesh Joseph (2016) Fish and pain: The politics of doubt. Animal Sentience 3(31)

Key, Brian (2016) Falsifying the null hypothesis that “fish do not feel pain". Animal Sentience 3(39)

Brown, Culum (2016) Fish pain: An inconvenient truth. Animal Sentience 3(32)

Damasio, Antonio and Damasio, Hanna (2016) Pain and other feelings in humans and animals. Animal Sentience 3(33)

Devor, Marshall (2016) Where is pain in the brain?. Animal Sentience 3(34)

Diggles, B. K. (2016) Fish pain: Would it change current best practice in the real world?. Animal Sentience 3(35)

Walters, Edgar T. (2016) Pain-capable neural substrates may be widely available in the animal kingdom. Animal Sentience 3(37)

Merker, Bjorn H. (2016) How not to move the line drawn on pain. Animal Sentience 3(40)

Safina, Carl (2016) Fish pain: A painful topic. Animal Sentience 3(41)

Bowers, Robert Ian (2016) Devaluation as a strategy to address behaviourally whether fish feel. Animal Sentience 3(43)

Key, Brian (2016) Burden of proof lies with proposer of celestial teapot hypothesis. Animal Sentience 3(44)

Safina, Carl (2016) Fish pain's burden of proof. Animal Sentience 3(45)

Merker, Bjorn H. (2016) The line drawn on pain still holds. Animal Sentience 3(46)

King, Barbara J (2016) Animal mourning: Précis of How animals grieve (King 2013). Animal Sentience 4(1)

Botero, Maria (2016) Death in the family. Animal Sentience 4(2)

Fox Hall, Tara (2016) Anticipatory grief. Animal Sentience 4(3)

Gardiner, Martin (2016) Modulation of behavior in communicating emotion. Animal Sentience 4(4)

Glymour, Clark (2016) The object of grief. Animal Sentience 4(5)

Probyn-Rapsey, Fiona (2016) Love’s claim on grief. Animal Sentience 4(6)

Proctor, Helen (2016) Monkey say, monkey do, monkey grieve?. Animal Sentience 4(7)

Ristau, Carolyn (2016) Evidence for animal grief?. Animal Sentience 4(8)

King, Barbara J. (2016) Understanding emotional suffering. Animal Sentience 4(9)

Colombo, Matteo (2016) Animal grieving and human mourning. Animal Sentience 4(10)

Chandrasekera, Charukeshi (2016) From sentience to science: Limits of anthropocentric cognition. Animal Sentience 5(2)

Copeland, Marion W. (2016) Life in translation. Animal Sentience 5(4)

Donaldson, Sue and Kymlicka, Will (2016) Linking animal ethics and animal welfare science. Animal Sentience 5(5)

Duncan, Ian J.H. (2016) Is sentience only a nonessential component of animal welfare?. Animal Sentience 5(6)

Durham, Debra (2016) The science of sentience is reshaping how we think about animals. Animal Sentience 5(7)

Rolle, M.E. (2016) Animal welfare and animal rights. Animal Sentience 5(8)

Rowlands, Mark (2016) Mentality and animal welfare. Animal Sentience 5(9)

Sammarco, Andrea L. (2016) Is humanitarianism recent?. Animal Sentience 5(10)

Broom, Donald M. (2016) Sentience and animal welfare: New thoughts and controversies. Animal Sentience 5(11)

Malpede, Karen (2016) Hermes in the Anthropocene: A dogologue. Animal Sentience 5(12)

Lachance, Martine (2016) Breaking the silence: The veterinarian’s duty to report. Animal Sentience 6(1)

Fawcett, Anne (2016) Veterinarians need support to break the silence. Animal Sentience 6(2)

Signal, Tania (2016) When the client is not the abuser, but one of the abused. Animal Sentience 6(3)

Gullone, Eleonora (2016) To minimize animal suffering, broaden the definition of animal cruelty. Animal Sentience 6(7)

Leadbeater, Simon R. B. (2016) Animal suffering calls for more than a bigger cage. Animal Sentience 7(4)

Marino, Lori (2016) Why animal welfarism continues to fail. Animal Sentience 7(5)

Marks, Joel (2016) End-state welfarism. Animal Sentience 7(6)

Rollin, Bernard E. (2016) Science and sensibility. Animal Sentience 7(7)

Li, Peter J. (2016) Animal suffering in China. Animal Sentience 7(8)

Bruers, Stijn (2016) Animal suffering and human bias. Animal Sentience 7(9)

Johannsen, Kyle (2016) Animal welfare at home and in the wild. Animal Sentience 7(10)

Paez, Eze (2016) Wild animal suffering and vegan outreach. Animal Sentience 7(11)

Smith, Allison M. and Reese, Jacy (2016) An empirical perspective on animal advocacy. Animal Sentience 7(12)

Clark, Stephen R. (2016) Slavery, welfare and the sixth extinction. Animal Sentience 7(13)

Faria, Catia (2016) Why we should not postpone awareness of wild animal suffering. Animal Sentience 7(14)

Horta, Oscar (2016) Changing attitudes towards animals in the wild and speciesism. Animal Sentience 7(15)

Sözmen, Beril (2016) Inalienable rights and pluralism in animal advocacy. Animal Sentience 7(16)

Dorado, Daniel (2016) Sentience as moral consideration and disvalue in nature. Animal Sentience 7(17)

Harnad, Stevan (2016) My orgasms cannot be traded off against others’ agony. Animal Sentience 7(18)

Ng, Yew-Kwang (2016) Utilitarianism generalized to include animals. Animal Sentience 7(19)

Balcombe, Jonathan (2016) In praise of fishes: Précis of What a fish knows (Balcombe 2016). Animal Sentience 8(1)

Wintner, Robert (2016) Reef society and the tyranny of data. Animal Sentience 8(2)

Kramer, Leo Bernd (2017) What does it feel like to be an electroreceptive fish?. Animal Sentience 8(3)

Stauffer, Jay R., Jr. (2017) The potential for sentience in fishes. Animal Sentience 8(4)

Siebeck, Ulrike E. (2017) Fish are flexible learners who can discriminate human faces. Animal Sentience 8(5)

Levenda, Kelly (2017) Sensitizing humans to fish sentience. Animal Sentience 8(6)

Balcombe, Jonathan (2017) Fishes are gaining academic respect. Animal Sentience 8(7)

Klein, Colin and Barron, Andrew B. (2016) Insects have the capacity for subjective experience. Animal Sentience 9(1)

Mather, Jennifer A. and Carere, Claudio (2016) Cephalopods are best candidates for invertebrate consciousness. Animal Sentience 9(2)

Merker, Bjorn H. (2016) Insects join the consciousness fray. Animal Sentience 9(4)

Tye, Michael (2016) Are insects sentient?. Animal Sentience 9(5)

Allen-Hermanson, Sean (2016) Is cortex necessary?. Animal Sentience 9(6)

Lamey, Andy (2016) Subjective experience and moral standing. Animal Sentience 9(7)

Fischer, Bob (2016) What if Klein & Barron are right about insect sentience?. Animal Sentience 9(8)

Rowlands, Mark (2016) Feel or perspective?. Animal Sentience 9(9)

Mallatt, Jon and Feinberg, Todd E. (2016) Insect consciousness: Fine-tuning the hypothesis. Animal Sentience 9(10)

Morsella, Ezequiel and Walker, Erica B. (2016) What makes us conscious is not what makes us human. Animal Sentience 9(11)

Shanahan, Murray (2016) Consciousness as integrated perception, motivation, cognition, and action. Animal Sentience 9(12)

Cruse, Holk and Schilling, Malte (2016) No proof for subjective experience in insects. Animal Sentience 9(13)

Edelman, Shimon; Moyal, Roy; and Fekete, Tomer (2016) To bee or not to bee?. Animal Sentience 9(14)

Adamo, Shelley (2016) Subjective experience in insects: Definitions and other difficulties. Animal Sentience 9(15)

Paul, Elizabeth S. and Mendl, Michael T. (2016) If insects have phenomenal consciousness, could they suffer?. Animal Sentience 9(16)

Key, Brian (2016) Phenomenal consciousness in insects? A possible way forward. Animal Sentience 9(17)

Elwood, Robert W. (2016) Might insects experience pain?. Animal Sentience 9(18)

Søvik, Eirik and Perry, Clint (2016) The evolutionary history of consciousness. Animal Sentience 9(19)

Hill, Christopher S. (2016) Insects: Still looking like zombies. Animal Sentience 9(20)

Klein, Colin and Barron, Andrew B. (2016) Insect consciousness: Commitments, conflicts and consequences. Animal Sentience 9(21)

Rowlands, Mark (2016) Are animals persons?. Animal Sentience 10(1)

Woodruff, Michael L. (2016) Implicit mental processes are an improbable basis for personhood. Animal Sentience 10(2)

Brakel, Linda A.W. (2016) Animals are agents. Animal Sentience 10(3)

Cheng, Tony (2016) Why animals are persons. Animal Sentience 10(4)

Broude, Gwen J. (2016) Who is a person? Whoever you want it to be. Animal Sentience 10(5)

Jürgens, Uta M. (2016) Universal modes of awareness? A “pre-reflective” premise. Animal Sentience 10(6)

Monsó, Susana (2016) The moral dimension of pre-reflective self-awareness. Animal Sentience 10(7)

Rollin, Bernard E. (2016) Unity of consciousness in animals. Animal Sentience 10(8)

Benz-Schwarzburg, Judith (2016) What do we owe animals as persons?. Animal Sentience 10(9)

Benz-Schwarzburg, Judith (2016) From thinking selves to social selves. Animal Sentience 10(10)

Irvine, Leslie (2016) The person and the self as social accomplishment. Animal Sentience 10(11)

King, James E. (2016) Animal personhood is an evolutionary issue. Animal Sentience 10(12)

Benvenuti, Anne (2016) Evolutionary continuity of personhood. Animal Sentience 10(13)

Rowlands, Mark (2016) Consciousness and the unity of mind. Animal Sentience 10(14)

Howe, Alex (2016) “HOT” so fast. Animal Sentience 10(15)

Barone, Pamela and Gomila, Antoni (2016) In what sense are you a person?. Animal Sentience 10(16)

Andrews, Kristin (2016) The psychological concept of “person”. Animal Sentience 10(17)

Gennaro, Rocco J. (2016) Unconscious higher-order thoughts (HOTs) as pre-reflective self-awareness?. Animal Sentience 10(18)

Steward, Helen (2016) Animals aren’t persons, but is it time for a neologism?. Animal Sentience 10(19)

Reber, Arthur S. (2016) Caterpillars, consciousness and the origins of mind. Animal Sentience 11(1)

Woodruff, Michael L. (2016) Bacteria and the cellular basis of consciousness. Animal Sentience 11(2)

Brakel, Linda A.W. (2016) Mind/body “hard problem” is not a category error. Animal Sentience 11(3)

Ristau, Carolyn A. (2016) Beginnings: Physics, sentience and LUCA. Animal Sentience 11(4)

Key, Brian (2016) “Cellular basis of consciousness”: Not just radical but wrong. Animal Sentience 11(5)

Velmans, Max (2016) How could consciousness emerge from adaptive functioning?. Animal Sentience 11(6)

Sheets-Johnstone, Maxine (2016) Darwin’s empirical evidence. Animal Sentience 11(7)

Ball, Derek (2016) No help on the hard problem. Animal Sentience 11(8)

Reber, Arthur S. (2016) Resolving the hard problem and calling for a small miracle. Animal Sentience 11(9)

Morsella, Ezequiel and Reyes, Zaviera (2016) The difference between conscious and unconscious brain circuits. Animal Sentience 11(10)

Ng, Yew-Kwang (2016) Consciousness and evolutionary biology. Animal Sentience 11(11)

Safina, Carl (2016) Reber’s caterpillar offers no help. Animal Sentience 11(12)

Broude, Gwen J. (2016) Still wondering how flesh can feel. Animal Sentience 11(13)

Reber, Arthur S. (2017) To identify all the relevant factors is to explain feeling. Animal Sentience 11(14)

Mallatt, Jon and Feinberg, Todd E. (2017) Consciousness is not inherent in but emergent from life. Animal Sentience 11(15)

Calvo, Paco (2018) Caterpillar/basil-plant tandems. Animal Sentience 11(16)

Reber, Arthur S. (2018) Sentient plants? Nervous minds?. Animal Sentience 11(17)

Zentall, Thomas R. (2016) Cognitive dissonance or contrast?. Animal Sentience 12(1)

Vonk, Jennifer (2017) What can research on nonhumans tell us about human dissonance?. Animal Sentience 12(2)

Eisenreich, Benjamin R. and Hayden, Benjamin Y. (2017) Choice-induced preference: A challenge for contrast. Animal Sentience 12(3)

Harmon-Jones, Cindy; Haslam, Nick; and Bastian, Brock (2017) Dissonance reduction in nonhuman animals: Implications for cognitive dissonance theory. Animal Sentience 12(4)

Harmon-Jones, Eddie (2017) Clarifying concepts in cognitive dissonance theory. Animal Sentience 12(5)

Zentall, Thomas (2017) Cognitive dissonance or contrast? It could be both. Animal Sentience 12(6)

Hall, Geoffrey (2017) Experiment versus analogy in the search for animal sentience. Animal Sentience 12(7)

Brodbeck, David R. and Brodbeck, Madeleine I. R. (2017) Cognitive continuity in cognitive dissonance. Animal Sentience 12(8)

Smith, Travis R. (2017) Establishing that contrast is cognitive dissonance. Animal Sentience 12(9)

Bodily, Kent D. (2017) Reductionism and accounts of cognitive dissonance. Animal Sentience 12(10)

Furlong, Ellen; Silver, Zachary; and Furlong, Jack (2018) Anthropocentrism as cognitive dissonance in animal research?. Animal Sentience 12(11)